How has pop culture upped the ante of masculinity

how-has-pop-culture-upped-the-ante-of-masculinity-photo-4 Influence

The Context of the Post:

Most of what I’ve presented so far has been related to masculinity. However, many people have told me they don’t care about masculinity (I still find it exciting and engaging, at least). Some even believe that men should be grateful for being able to separate from women. These kinds of comments are often made in response to gender inequality but also by folks who do not want to think about how masculinity has changed dramatically since the 1950s. If you don’t think about gender inequality, you can say, “men are free” or “don’t get me started on all these awful men,” without thinking about what this means for those with different expectations. This kind of comment isn’t intended as an insult; it’s just meant as an excuse for not engaging with complex issues involving gender relations and social expectations – which is fine! Not everyone wants to have a conversation about gender relations – we all have our own lives and our problems. But if you want to tell me that I’m being unfair by focusing on masculinity in my post on The 50 Greatest Movies About Men, I’m happy for that conversation!

My Argument… 1) The American Male popularized style-over-substance values 2) His rise marked a cultural shift from Rags-to-riches stories 3) For him to succeed in his quest, he’s had to overcome both societal expectations regarding femininity and regard 4) He’s had obstacles placed against him 5) He’s needed support from female characters 6) He has to defend himself against misogyny 7) He’s needed the help of other heroes 8 ) He was influenced by comic books 9 ) And he still is today 10 ) As with most heroes/villains according Ms. Lastra, he NEEDS YOU MOMENTS OF RESIST.

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The all-American male has undergone a massive transformation in the last 50 years, and his story is told through American cinema’s changing heroes and villains.

The all-American male has undergone a massive transformation in the last 50 years, and his story is told through American cinema’s changing heroes and villains.

The masculine ideal once enshrined in John Wayne films has been usurped by new stars like Ryan Gosling and Will Smith, who are more diverse than any previous generation of men onscreen. The rise of these new leading men also marks an increase in diversity among directors: artists like Wes Anderson, Quentin Tarantino, Steven Soderbergh, and Sofia Coppola have all broken ground with films that challenge traditional notions about masculinity.

The woman’s picture is essential to the male hero’s persona. This might be true of the 1930s male, but we must do real-world research before answering that question.

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More on particular heroes in a moment, but I digress…

We need to know how often the man is shown with a woman. If he’s rarely shown with one, then the way he’s represented in popular culture suggests his masculinity will be questioned. Conversely, if he tends toward women (as well as other men), his masculinity will be seen as unquestioned – at least within his limited field of view.

But what do these numbers mean? What does it even mean to say that there are more masculine men than feminine men? For this research to be valid, it has to address more than just what appears on screen – it has to acknowledge reality beyond the Hollywood studio gates.

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Unfortunately, there are only a few solid numbers here; we have anecdotal references and various measurements.

And yet they are only somewhat helpful…

Hollywood creates heroes who go against social convention and their standards of behavior – or who live outside those conventions. They need loved ones (whether romantic partners or family members). They may prove their value by fighting villains who represent evil forces: often an oppressive government or someone else who uses brute force against ordinary people (e.g., terrorists). The heroes often forge alliances with other male characters and sometimes team up with them as brothers-in-arms – unless they’re portrayed as enemies; then, they might act as rivals instead (see “mythic brotherhood” above). Anyone can become a hero, including child characters…but not everyone chooses that path; see “titillation.” Like most other things in life,

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