How did pop culture change lives in the 1950s

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TV shows changed how people lived.

TV shows changed how people lived.

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In the early days of television, there was a lot of drama around networks and their policies on what could be broadcasted. Shows like “The Phil Silvers Show” were canceled because they were considered too risqué; however, they found new life on other stations after the original network dropped them.

This type of freedom provided by television allowed people to express themselves without fear of censure or social stigma. This is one reason why so many kids today watch cartoons and superhero movies: They can escape into worlds where being different isn’t a problem!

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What people watched made a difference in their daily lives.

As you can see, TV was a place where people could belong. It wasn’t just the shows they watched—it was also the friends they made while watching them. Watching TV with friends was fun and allowed kids to learn about other cultures and countries around the globe.

Popular culture was where people could belong, and kids could spend time with their friends. TV shows were a place to escape from the real world, where they could pretend that everything was perfect instead of living with war or poverty at home.

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Kids also loved these shows because they gave them an outlet for creative expression: writing stories about their favorite characters and drawing pictures of them (see: Mickey Mouse).

Many kids watched TV, and the shows provided a place to belong.

TV was a place where people could belong. In the 1950s, there were no 24-hour cable channels or streaming services like Netflix or Hulu; instead, you had to wait for your local PBS station to show reruns of shows that aired in the 1940s and 1950s. As a result, kids would spend their time watching TV with friends at home: playing games like Monopoly or Sorry! (sorry, not sorry), getting up early on Saturday mornings to catch The Breakfast Club on ABC, even just sitting around watching cartoons on Saturday morning while they waited for Mommy’s bedtime stories at night—all these things were part of growing up in this era!

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You also learned about life through pop culture: what it means to be an adult? How do people get along with each other? What does it mean when someone says, “I love you”? These lessons came from television shows such as Leave It To Beaver and Father Knows Best which taught young viewers values such as responsibility and honesty—and most importantly, making sure everyone gets along well together no matter who they are.”

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